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Leigh Brackett’s Future History, part 2

September 16, 2011

Leigh Brackett’s Future History – Connecting the Stories: An Examination
An essay by Blue Tyson

This essay follows on from Part 1 here.

Part 2

Rio Bravos
There is no reason, in a creative mythography sense, that the adventures of sheriff John T Chance in protecting his town along with his friends cannot be included here, or even James Beckwourth’s frontier work. There is actually no direct mention of the historical 19th century at all that I am aware of in her stories other than these.

L.A. Confidential
As goes the Wild West, the same for the mean streets of 1940s USA and the crooks, cops, dicks, dames and other unfortunates in the following: No Good from a Corpse, Stranger At Home, Murder Is Bigamy, Red-Headed Poison, Murder in the Family, Design for Dying, I Feel Bad Killing You, No Star Is Lost and The Misfortune Teller, or even the late fifties in The Tiger Among Us, An Eye For an Eye, and So Pale, So Cold, So Fair. The sixties are represented by Silent Partner and The True Death of Juanito Rodriguez.

They Walk Among Us
The 1950s saw aliens with starfaring capability come into contact with humans who discovered what they were, but only in isolated incidents. Wisely, they appeared to have kept away from the big cities. Possibly due to the prevalence of too many smart investigators in places like Los Angeles that may have discovered them eventually and blown the whistle.

In 1950, a local Newhale reporter discovers the Hrylliannu using the area to bring people to Earth in ‘The Queer Ones’. In fact, there is even a hybrid child produced, but they cover their tracks well. This year also saw a Pennsylvania farmer and his children encounter joyriding alien children in ‘The Truants’. Parents from both worlds were happy for no-one to know about this.

Cornwall in 1952 sees Earthman Michael Trehearne discover he is of Varddan extraction in The Starmen Of Lyrdis. As such he possesses the mutant gene to allow him to survive their particularly exacting form of interstellar travel, over which they have a monopoly. As we see here, and with later human ingenuity on display, the Varddans are far from the only people with interstellar travel technology, so they rapidly become of little interest, barely a curiosity. Those that require genetic quirks to survive space travel are not going to be able to compete with the crews of ships that do not, by sheer weight of numbers.

The Coming of the Terrans
A detailed examination of the colonisation era of the Inner Worlds is beyond the scope of this article, but the collection above does give some dates:

There were conflicts and uprisings on Mars that were pro-native. The Martians were more technologically advanced and capable than the native Venusians, so did not suffer the same wars and brutal colonialist programs of slaughter and military action.

1998 ‘The Beast-Jewel of Mars’
2016 ‘Mars Minus Bisha’
2024 ‘The Last Days of Shandakor’
2031 ‘Purple Priestess of the Mad Moon’
2038 ‘The Road to Sinharat’

‘Queen of the Martian Catacombs’ would happen around these times as mention is made of the Shanga trade in that story:

“Stark realized now what secret vice Kala sold here. Shanga – the going back – the radiation that caused temporary artificial atavism and let men wallow for a time in beasthood. It was supposed to have been stamped out when the Lady Fand’s dark Shanga ring had been destroyed. But it still persisted, in places like this outside the law.”

So the later Stark stories ‘Black Amazon of Mars’ and ‘Enchantress of Venus’ should all be in this range, them or their expanded versions.

In ‘Cube From Space’, there is an encounter with representatives of two interstellar capable alien races: “I am Crom. I was king once, in a land called Yf. And they are the Rakshi. The time came when we had to fight them, we humans, because we couldn’t take any more.”

The Big Jump Outwards
Things changed considerably when the Cochrane Company make the breakthrough to discover a method of fast interstellar travel thanks to their engineer Ballantyne and his drive (The Big Jump). The failure of Barnard II as a colony and exploitation site because of the Transurane was never going to deter further exploration. Nor was the fact that prototypes will have problems. “… whole robot-shift for the drive had bugs in it. The relays won’t take the load. Rip it out and rebuild it …” Even though the Cochranes may lost the taste for it, others would not.

Planetary Survey
The Preliminary Planetary Survey revisits Barnard II in How Bright the Stars:

“It was a hellish world to be wandering on, this second planet of Barnard’s Star.”

“Man had finally made the Big Jump outward, with the Wenz-Boroda FTL (faster-than-light) drive, and the exploration of the galaxy had begun.”

The more stable starship propulsion technology had made this possible. Men could also live on Barnard II if they wanted to, but as Jerry Baird discovers, it is still pointless. The galaxy is a hostile environment, in general, but has countless other stars to explore.

Here man has been concentrating on nearby reachable neighbourhood stars, such as Altair in ‘The Woman From Altair’. One of the spacemen here actually brings back a wife from one of the Altairan planets, to tragic consequences.

Galactic Survey
So successful has man been at least with the ability to explore, if not the usefulness of end targets even getting to stars and planets without name so many have been visited. The Galactic Survey era shows the technology has been developed to enable ships to push past the nearby sites such as Barnard’s Star, Proxima and Alpha Centauri, etc.

During ‘The Shadows’ tired and disillusioned Exploration Team leader Barrier finds the remnants of a race destroyed by astrological catastrophe, and their faithful doglike servants.

“Maybe there enough worth in us that here and there some little world will give us another chance. Anyway, it’s nice to know there’s one place where we have some friends.”

An explicit reference to a far away settlement is given in ‘Come Sing the Moons of Moravenn’. The planet in this story has a topaz colored star in the vicinity of the Vela Spur, which could mean it is up to thousands of light years away.

However, things do change, as should have pleased Barrier greatly. There is a Galactic Union out there, and races involved in this organisation do come into contact with Earth and the Solar System. In fact, in ‘All the Colors of the Rainbow’ Mintakan weather engineers on Earth have a violent encounter with nowheresville USA racist rednecks. As the engineer Flin notes: “It was his first big job on his own responsibility, with no superior closer than Galactic Center, which was a long way off.” Racism has always been in existence in the Solar System, but such recidivism again is not going to deter the benefits of expansion and exploration.

Sometimes though, it takes some special people becoming involved to sort some planets out. To whit, Simon Ashton and Eric John Stark in The Ginger Star:

“A newly discovered, newly opened world called Skaith that hardly anyone had ever heard of, except at Galactic Center. Skaith was not a member of the Union but there had been a consulate. Someone had called to the Union for help, and Ashton was the man who went to see about it.”

Stark leaves from Pax to head for Skaith. In ‘Last Call From Sector 9G’ we find operatives at Galactic Center:

“The city was beautiful. Its official name was Galactic Center, but it was called The Hub because that is what it was, the hub and focus of a galaxy. It was the biggest city in the Milky Way. It covered almost the entire land area of the third planet of a Type G star that someone with a sense of humor had christened Pax. The planet was chosen originally because it was centrally located and had no inhabitants, and because it was within the limits of tolerance for the humanoid races.”

“He was remembering how he had seen it when he was fresh from Earth, for the first time—the supreme capital, beside which the world capitals were only toy cities, the heart and center of the galaxy where the decisions were made and the great men came and went.”

Note that in ‘All the Colors of the Rainbow’ there are Mintakan engineers working on Earth. In ‘Last Call From Sector 9G’:

“BAYA sat on the bed and watched him pack. She was from one of the worlds of Mintaka, and as humanoid as they came”.

The Galactic Center and Pax and the Federation of Worlds would appear to be the same. In fact this hard to find until New Year’s eve gives the greatest detail on the interstellar setting of any of the work, so is important from that point of view.

Interplanetary Wars
Even though expansion can take off some of the population pressure, resources are still an issue, and wars still happen. Mars is particularly water-poor when looking to rapidly increase population by colonisation.

While not a war, ‘Water Pirate’ is certainly about resources.

“It was early in 2418 that the Solar System realized that there was a Water Pirate. The great tanker ships, carrying water to the rich dry-world mines and colonies, began to vanish from the space-lanes, with their convoys. The Trans-Galactic Convoy Fleet, which for two hundred years had kept the space-ways safe, was suddenly helpless.”

The Earth-Venus War saw Mars neutral in ‘No Man’s Land In Space’, and Mars also fought against the Jovians with Earth and Venus as seen in ‘Outpost On Io’.

Mars fought a World War in 2504, then became embroiled in an Interplanetary conflict later in the 26th century and tried a disguised sneak attack on Venus, which was foiled in ‘Interplanetary Reporter’.

In ‘A World Is Born’: “who had conceived this plan of building a new world for the destitute and desperate veterans of the Second Interplanetary War”. It is not clear if this is meant to refer to one of the past wars, as a well understood by veterans term, or a completely new conflict. It is possible that the Second Interplanetary War meant is referenced in ‘Thralls Of the Endless Night’, with a documentary discovery:

“Treaty of Alliance between the Sovereign Earth and the Union of Jovian Moons, providing for Earthly colonization and development of the said Moons, and mutual aid against Aggressor Worlds.”

“…have taken the precaution of Halm, the treaty secretly in a ship of colonists, in care of the captain who knows nothing of its nature. It has been rumored that our mutual enemy, the Martio-Venusian Alliance, may try to intercept it, possibly with the aid of hired pirates. This would, as you know, mean war. It is my prayer that the treaty will safely…”

Stabilization and Desperation
Alpha Centauri or Die shows a Solar System government either disillusioned with interstellar travel, or perhaps having more jackboot clad reasons. They do not want the people to have the freedom to travel and communicate in an uncontrolled fashion. This is explained by the bitter would be escapees:

“But damn them all eternally, even so. Because of them all the Stabilization Acts had passed. Trade Stabilization. Population Stabilization. Crop Stabilization. The busy minds of the experts working. Take the manned ships out of space and there can’t be any trade wars or any other kinds of wars. The worlds can’t get at each other to fight. Stop expansion outward to the stars and eliminate the risks, the economic upsets that attend every major change, the unpredictable rise and shift of power. Stabilize. Regulate. Control. We may lose a few unimportant liberties but think what well gain. Security for all, and for all time to come! And the dark ships of the Government will keep you safe.”

“The populations of the Solar System had been carefully figured to the last decimal point and portioned out among the planets according to food- and employment-potential, so that nowhere was there a scarcity or an overplus, and nobody’s individual whim was allowed to upset the balance. If you wanted to change your residence from one sector or one world to another, the red tape involved was so enormous that men had been known to die of old age while waiting for a permit.”

If this sort of control is extended and expanded, then the consequences could easily appear in ‘Retreat To The Stars’. The 40th century shows a more extreme Soviet-like political structure in the Tri-State, compared to the more extreme right-wing colonialism or American style capitalistic expansion of earlier times. ‘In Retreat To the Stars’ there are a few rebels on an asteroid base still resisting state control. They are desperately building a starship to escape. The implication here is that starfaring technology is government controlled.

With a Future History of many centuries, cycles of political ideologies and experiments would not be at all surprising. Few dates are given in Brackett stories, so the Alpha Centauri or Die/’Ark of Mars’ situations could have been followed by relaxing restrictions and great expansionism again, cycling around again until the 40th century.

For example, A Peace and Happiness doctrine backed up by actual brainwashing technology saw President Hilton rule the Federation of Worlds in ‘Child Of the Sun’.

“There was no way out ahead, either. Mercury was there, harsh and bitter in the naked blaze of the sun. The ships of Gantry Hilton, President of the Federation of Worlds, inventor of the Psycho-Adjuster, and ruler of men’s souls, were herding him down to a landing at the lonely Spaceguard outpost.”

The Unregenerate rebels have almost lost completely and are also looking for a place to flee. “Unregeneracy was almost dead in the inhabited worlds.” Falken and Moore do so, and find an immensely powerful stellar energy being using a small world as a plaything, and hope to use him to help them survive Hiltonist oppression.

Two thousand years between The Coming of the Terrans and ‘Retreat To the Stars’ leaves a lot of time for things to change and plenty of chronological slots for the above to fit in.

On analysing the stories in this way, it does appear there is good evidence to include most of them in a coherent Future History.

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