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Up the Walls of the World, James Tiptree Jr

April 22, 2014

upthewallsofhteworldUp the Walls of the World, James Tiptree Jr (1978)
Review by M Fenn

I came to Up the Walls of the World knowing very little of James Tiptree, Jr. I knew that the author’s real name was Alice Bradley Sheldon and that her publisher kept her identity secret until 1977 (the year before Up the Walls of the World was released). The science fiction community argued over who Tiptree was (some sort of government spy perhaps) and what gender (both Robert Silverberg and Harlan Ellison assumed male).

But that’s all I knew. I’d never read her stuff, even though several of her books have been on our bookshelves for ages. So, it was with a lot of curiosity and excitement that I started reading what was Tiptree’s first novel. It held up to that approach, I’m happy to say.

Up the Walls of the World is a complicated tale, starting in the brain of the Destroyer, an entity larger than a solar system moving through space in existential pain. It considers itself evil and a betrayer of its kind.

Tiptree introduces us next to an entity that can pick up on that evil. She is a Tyrenni, part of a race of creatures resembling manta rays who ride the winds of a large gas planet’s atmosphere and communicate telepathically and through the changing colors of their bodies. Something is destroying the Tyrenni’s planet.

Next we meet a group of plain old humans. Well, not exactly. They’re a group of supposedly telepathic folk conducting experiments at a US Navy laboratory.

The book moves amongst all three of these. I was most interested in the Tyrenni because I had never read anything like them before. Tiptree did a great job of creating a wholly other sentient species that is utterly unhuman, and she still found space to play with gender and society. In Tyrenni culture, males are the childbearers and hold a higher place in society because of it. The females are the explorers and have all the fun.

The humans took time to grow on me. I initially found the group’s medical doctor (and our introduction to this aspect of the book) to be annoying in his attitudes and near fetishization of the team’s only Black member and IT chief, Margaret Omali. But there’s an aspect to Daniel Dann’s character that reveals itself slowly through the book and helped diffuse some of that.

The Destroyer itself is simply brilliant and the reveal of its true mission made me smile, as did the way Tiptree wove all three elements of the book together into a satisfying conclusion.

Up the Walls of the World is one of the most original books of any genre I’ve read in a long time and a fun read. I ended up loving most of her characters, especially Tivonel, the first Tyrenni we meet. And the book kept me guessing most of the way. Highly recommended.

I also wonder if this is where Joss Whedon got Faith’s catchphrase, because there it is on page 133.

“Five by five!” Costakis calls out again, and then Winona exclaims in a strained voice, “Doctor Catledge, this is wild. I know we’re getting them.”

This review originally appeared on M. Fenn.

4 Comments leave one →
  1. April 22, 2014 2:07 pm

    Thanks for reblogging my review! One tiny little nit, though: it’s Joss Whedon, not Jiss.🙂

  2. April 23, 2014 8:38 am

    Sorted. Not sure how that snuck in there🙂

  3. April 25, 2014 2:31 am

    I adored the profoundly alien quality of the Tyrenni, and thirty years later still dream of them.

    “Five by five” began as radio operator slang: assessing the perceived quality of five
    important measures. Shortwave listeners record Signal, Noise, Interference, Propagation and “Overall Merit” (yeah, I don’t know), where a score of 1 is terrible and 5 is perfect. So 5 x 5 (aka “five by”) communicates “I’m receiving absolutely everything you’re saying: message, subtext, culture, context &c.” This slang has propagated perfectly through all domains of radio communication; there may be sysdmins using it now for all I know.

    • July 6, 2014 7:52 pm

      Thanks for explaining “five by five.” I never knew that. Sorry not to reply before now; just saw your comment.

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